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It’s hard to believe that 500 years have passed since a monk and professor of theology nailed his “95 Theses” to the door of the church at Wittenburg, Germany.

On October 31, 1517, Martin Luther lit a match that spread a wildfire across Europe and changed things from the way people did church, to church architecture, to church music, to increasing literacy rates.

We just completed a sermon series on The Five Solas of the Reformation. Although they weren’t named that until about 100 years ago, the Five Solas summarize the most important theological points that emerged from the Reformation. They were:

Sola Scriptura — by Scripture Alone
Sola Gratia — by Grace Alone
Sola Fide — by Faith Alone
Solus Cristus — by Christ Alone
Soli deo gloria — glory to God Alone

Over the past five weeks, we saw that:

The Bible alone is our authority of matters of faith and practice.
We are justified by God’s grace alone.
We are justified by faith alone, but not faith that is alone.
We are justified by faith in Jesus Christ alone.
We are justified to the glory of God alone.

Notice the word alone. That one word was the key that differentiated the Reformers with the Roman Catholic Church of the day.

Please check out the audio of my sermons in the series to learn more. Come and see what God is doing at Fellowship Baptist Church in Weatherford, Texas!

 

Oftentimes, spiritual growth and sharing the Gospel are not seen as being related. Well, of course you have to have embraced the Gospel message to be born spiritually in order to grow spiritually. However, I’m talking about once you’re saved, there’s not a lot of emphasis on witnessing. At least for many church-goers.

Last week, we looked at the issue of spiritual growth and sharing the Gospel. We looked at the context of Jesus’ comments about “the fields are white for harvest” from John 4: the Samaritan “woman at the well” went to invite the townspeople to come meet Jesus who knew all sorts of things about her (as well as her friends and lovers). As they were coming to Jesus, He told His disciples that, “the fields are white for harvest”. (John 4:35)

Our job is to pray to the Lord of the Harvest, asking Him to send His workers into the harvest (Luke 10:2). By the way, that doesn’t mean that we pray for somebody else to come along and do the work for us. The idea is that we ask God to send others to help us bring in the harvest. So how do we do that?

One plan is called 4xFour and it was developed by Greg Wallace of Woodridge Baptist Church of Kingwood, Texas. He suggests the first step is to Identify four “unchurched” (i.e., lost) people within your circle of influence, whom God wants you to share your faith. To do that, we have to realize that there is a harvest, we are called to be involved in bringing in the harvest, and that now is the time to be about the Lord’s business of bringing in the harvest. And that requires that we pray, asking God to lead us to our “four” (we don’t just pick out four random people).

This is just the first step of one plan, which I suggested for Fellowship Baptist Church. You may not like this plan. That’s ok. So what is your plan? How is your plan working for you? (I assume you have a plan)

God hasn’t called anybody to win the entire world to Christ. But God intends all of us to witness to some (1Cor 9:22). We can start by Identifying your “Four”.

So have you identified your “Four”?

Pastor Craig
Luke 10:2

A friend asked me on Facebook to comment on an article, “Let’s Stop Singing These 10 Worship Songs“. Here’s my response.

Setting words to music has always been an appropriate way that God’s people have worshiped Him and “testified” of Him. In contrast to what “non-instrumental” church leaders say, the Bible (especially Psalms) does an excellent job of including every known way and every known musical instrument to praise God. Paul links the results of singing of “Psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs” with both “being filled with the Spirit” (Eph 5:18-19) and “letting the Word of Christ dwell in us” (Col 3:16).

Several decades ago, the Christian band “Glad” presented “Variations on a Hymn” that brought out how people have used contemporary music of the day (whatever the generation) to sing their words of worship and testimony.

I believe that music without lyrics cannot *adequately* express the heart cry of worship. But unless we’re setting Scripture to music, we run the risk of inaccurately expressing the heart cry of worship. And there’s the rub.

As one of my seminary professors pointed out oftentimes worship songs express words of deep intimacy. Terms of endearment sometimes come across as uncomfortable-sounding to people who are not as used to such word pictures. And that’s unfortunate. The result is that a “preference issue” is presented as a “Biblical issue”

There are many traditional hymns as well as modern “praise and worship” songs that express deep and rich theology. And there are some traditional hymns and modern songs that express bad theology as well. One “traditional” song that comes to mind is “Love Lifted Me”. Not only is it a bad mix of a happy-sounding melody with a discussion of the unhappy topic of sin, the first verse is just plain wrong! I wasn’t simply “sinking deep in sin, far from the peaceful shore, very deeply stained with sin, sinking to rise no more”. The Bible tells me that I was dead and at the bottom of the ocean of sin with absolutely no hope of life. I was not only “deeply stained with sin”; I totally and radically corrupted by it.

The article my friend linked to points out some of the issues with modern songs. I felt the writer was not just a little nit-picky in her critique. As an example, she says “Lord I Lift Your Name on High” presents only a “small fraction of the fullness of the gospel story”. I honestly wonder how she would attempt to present “the fullness of the gospel story” in any single song, sermon, or book. In looking at her bio and a list of her website’s other articles, I would tend to classify the website as belonging to someone on a witch hunt, a website more inclined to criticize than edify. Unfortunately, “preference” issues are presented as “Biblical” issues.

Bob Kauflin, one of the original members of the Christian band Glad, has written some really good articles on worship and music. His website is Worship Matters. I recommend reading his insights on the issue.

So, what do you think?

 

Too often we measure ministries by “nickels and noses” or “buildings, budgets, and butts”. If you’re around a group of pastors of different churches, the topic of church size quickly comes up, one will brag about his church’s latest building program, another brags about his latest offering, and still another about how many new members have recently joined the church. And if you ask how many people attended last Sunday Morning’s church service, you will hear a “ministerialy-speaking” number that more often than not, is inflated.

Speaking of inflated numbers…. the first church I pastored had nearly 300 members! But I don’t know that even on the “high attendance” Sundays of Christmas and Easter we ever had more than 50 people in the sanctuary. As we dug into the names, we found that we only recognized about 60. Sixty of 300 names!

You rarely hear of churches cleaning up their rolls, mainly because reporting the numbers accurately makes it look like the church has had a drastic drop in membership. And smaller memberships mean fewer people can go to denominational meetings and vote on behalf of your church. But, honestly, how many people go to those denominational meetings anymore anyway?

Wanting to account for the actual number of sheep in our fold, we began removing the names of people we didn’t know, or that we knew had died. So what happened to so many people on the membership roll? I suspect that many moved away, joined another church, or simply dropped out. Perhaps many were children who prayed a prayer during a Vacation Bible School over the course of 30+ years, and their names were added to the membership and they were never heard from again. (and did we ever follow up with them?)

I have heard of church business meetings where a number of people showed up for the first time in years in order to vote out a pastor (maybe some people didn’t like the way he parted his hair) or to change the direction a pastor was trying to lead the church (perhaps to be less “religious” and to be more like Jesus). Phone calls were made and accusations were leveled, with the result of the poor church clerk having to pour through the membership roster to make sure that everyone in the meeting was entitled to vote, based on their “membership” in the church. I must confess that this is one of the reasons I wanted to clean up the membership rolls; I didn’t want the church to be sabotaged by people who had no vested interest in the normal operations of the church. If there were people who wanted to maintain membership so they could have a “church marriage” or a “church funeral”, I was prepared to conduct their services, but I felt that those “members” had “broken covenant” by choosing to no longer attend and support the church with their time, talent, and their treasures.

So what is church membership?

Even after paring down the list of names to those 60 that we knew, we still had some names on the list because they were family members of charter church members, for whatever reason afraid of removing their grandchild or cousin from the roll. Were they afraid they wouldn’t come back to church? Hadn’t the grandchild or cousin already made that decision?

OK, I’ll step off my soapbox after saying that we need to seriously consider what “church membership” means. By “we”, I mean churches, staff, as well as everyone who calls themselves a “church member”. Wouldn’t it be better to call everyone either a church member or church attender based on their investment of time, talent, and yes… treasures?

 

I came across a really good post this morning that addresses this question of how to best measure one’s ministry. From a pastor’s perspective, I believe we should change our criteria.