Did They Really?

Bible | Grace | Greek

I happened upon an interesting blog today: “They Ceased. Period.” It was an interview with Dr. John MacArthur regarding the “charismatic” gifts of the spirit. MacArthur is a cessationist, meaning that he believes that gifts of healing, miracles, tongues, etc. passed away with the First Century Apostles.

While I respect Dr. MacArthur’s diligent grammatical study of “stilled” in 1Cor 13:8, he completely ignores the context of the grammar in light of the surrounding sentences. In other words, he centers his entire argument on one word and its grammatical usage, ignoring the fact that words have meaning in the context of sentences. 1Corinthians 13:9-12 says that we do not fully know yet, and until we get to that time, we will still need God’s gifts of grace.

MacArthur says,

“If [charismatic] gifts existed, they would belong to the purest, most faithful, sound teachers of the Word of God to authenticate their teaching…”

Is he actually saying that the “orthodox” preachers today (presumably, MacArthur himself) would be more deserving of God’s gifts of grace than the Charismatic Prosperity Gospel Preachers (eg., Benny Hinn)? Doesn’t that turn “grace” on its head? Besides, I don’t think the main purpose of the sign gifts was to “authenticate” the apostles’ teaching, anyway.

Yes, absolutely, there are excesses. Their existence cannot be denied. However, the existence of excesses doesn’t deny their validity. In other words, the misuse of a gift doesn’t mean the gift doesn’t exist. And one’s theology, however straight or deviant, neither affirms nor denies the validity of a gift.

I think Jack Deere has done a fine job of establishing a continuance view (as opposed to a cessationist view) of the charismatic gifts in Surprised by the Power of the Spirit (Zondervan 1993) and Surprised by the Voice of God (Zondervan 1996). Dr. Deere was a professor at Dallas Seminary, a bastion of cessationist theology, who wasn’t looking for a charismatic experience, but was confronted by a God Who still speaks and acts — it forever changed his life and the way he understood God. Deere is no “wacko” Bible teacher; endorsements from Wayne Grudem, professor of Biblical and Systematic Theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, appear on both of Deere’s books. I highly recommend them to anyone interested in the topic.

Cessationists like MacArthur seem to believe that, if the charismatic gifts existed, they would appear in their churches, and since the gifts don’t appear in their churches, those gifts don’t exist — therefore any appearance elsewhere must be counterfeit. We must be very careful in labeling all “miraculous” works” as “counterfeit”. Counterfeit means fake, thus its origin is not from God. If something is not from God, it is either from man or the devil. Compare that with Jesus warning in Matt 12:31-32 where the Pharisees were attributing Jesus’ works to the devil.

 

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